Advertisement

Ganesh Versus the Third Reich as Pedagogical Parable

  • Glenn D’Cruz
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is about the similarities between teaching and directing with respect to power relationships and ethics. However, its primary focus is on the celebrated play Ganesh Versus the Third Reich (2011) by Back to Back Theatre, which I read as a parable for understanding the power dynamics that suffuse all pedagogical activities. Unlike the majority of case studies in this book, Ganesh Versus the Third Reich was produced by a professional theatre company, Australia’s acclaimed Back to Back Theatre, and has no connection with a university. It does, however, provide an uncommonly astute analysis of the power relations at play within the theatre-production environment, thereby introducing one of this book’s major themes: equality, or the (im)possibility of equality, in the pedagogical situation.

References

  1. Axelrod, Paul. 2002. Values in Conflict: The University, the Marketplace, and the Trials of Liberal Education. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Berlatsky, Noah. 2014. The ‘Dead Poets Society’ Takeover of America: How Memes Ate Our Politics. Salon, February 22. http://www.salon.com/2014/02/26/the_dead_poets_society_takeover_of_america_how_memes_ate_our_politics
  3. Calvert, Dave. 2016. ‘Everything Has a Fucking Value’: Negative Dialectics in the Work of Back to Back Theatre. Contemporary Theatre Review 26 (2): 134–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Coslovich, Gabriella. 2011. The Elephant in the Room. The Saturday Age, 20–21, September 24.Google Scholar
  5. Edwards, Marc A., and Siddhartha Roy. 2017. Academic Research in the 21st Century: Maintaining Scientific Integrity in a Climate of Perverse Incentives and Hypercompetition. Environmental Engineering Science 34 (1): 51–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Eisner, Elliot W. 2002. What Can Education Learn from the Arts about the Practice of Education? Journal of Curriculum and Supervision 18 (1): 4–16.Google Scholar
  7. Ganesh Versus the Third Reich Script. 2013. In “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility, ed. Helena Grehan and Peter Eckersall, 159–194. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  8. Gladwin, Bruce, and Richard Gough. 2013. Making Room for Elephants: Bruce Gladwin in Conversation with Richard Gough. In “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility, ed. Helena Grehan and Peter Eckersall, 231–257. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  9. Grehan, Helena. 2013. Irony, Parody and Satire in Ganesh Versus the Third Reich. In “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility, ed. Helena Grehan and Peter Eckersall, 197–207. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  10. Grehan, Helena, and Peter Eckersall, eds. 2013. “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  11. Lehmann, Hans-Thies. 2006. Postdramatic Theatre. Translated and with an introduction by Karen Jürs-Munby. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  12. Prior, Yoni. 2013. Scott’s Aired a Couple of Things: Back to Back Theatre Rehearse Ganesh Versus the Third Reich. In “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility, ed. Helena Grehan and Peter Eckersall, 208–217. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  13. Ramsden, Paul. 1991. A Performance Indicator of Teaching Quality in Higher Education: The Course Experience Questionnaire. Studies in Higher Education 16 (2): 129–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Rancière, Jacques. 1991. The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation. Translated and with an introduction by Kristin Ross. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. ———. 2004. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible. Translated by Gabriel Rockhill. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
  16. ———. 2009. The Emancipated Spectator. Translated by Gregory Elliot. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  17. Sabatini, Arthur J. 2002. The Dialogics of Performance and Pedagogy. In Teaching Performance Studies, ed. Nathan Stucky and Cynthia Wimmer, 191–204. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Scheer, Anna. 2013. The Impossible Fairytale, or Resistance to the Real. In “We’re People Who Do Shows”: Back to Back Theatre—Performance, Politics, Visibility, ed. Helena Grehan and Peter Eckersall, 218–226. Aberystwyth: Performance Research Books.Google Scholar
  19. Schmidt, Theron. 2013. Outsider Theatre: A Journey Through Back to Back’s Hell House. Performance Research 18 (1): 139–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Sher, Antony. 2015. Year of the Fat Knight: The Falstaff Diaries. London: Nick Hern.Google Scholar
  21. Wangh, Stephen. 2013. The Heart of Teaching. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. Wright, Elizabeth. 1989. Post-Modern Brecht: A Re-Presentation. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glenn D’Cruz
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Communication & Creative ArtDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia

Personalised recommendations