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Identification of the Sediment Sources Using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Technique

  • Swapan Kumar MaityEmail author
  • Ramkrishna Maiti
Chapter
  • 204 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Earth Sciences book series (BRIEFSEARTH)

Abstract

X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique is used to understand the sources of sediments through identification of mineral composition of sediments in the lower reach of the Rupnarayan River to explain the causes and mechanisms of sedimentation. A total of 21 sediment samples (13 samples from river bed and 8 samples from river banks) have been collected for knowing the sediment mineralogy. Sediment samples are washed by boiled distilled water, dried, disintegrated and scanned at an interval of 7°–45°2θ in XPERT-PRO diffractometer. Diffractograms produced by XRD study indicates that the entire lower reach shows the dominance of the minerals such as quartz, chlorite, illite, anatase, goethite, oligoclase, chloritoid, corundum, sillimanite, which have their origin in the upper and middle catchment area with small contribution from the lower catchment and river banks. Statistical experiment indicates that excluding tourmaline and anatase, all the minerals show steady trend in concentration in sediments. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicates that five Eigen values contribute for about 83.154% of the total variation of the distribution of minerals. The minerals discharged from the upper catchment are captured in the estuary and again redistributed towards upstream by stronger flood tide. This leads to a un-conspicuous and hapazard distribution of minerals in the area under study.

Keywords

Sedimentation Mineral composition X-ray diffraction Sediment sources PCA 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyNayagram P.R.M. Government CollegeJhargramIndia
  2. 2.Department of Geography and Environment ManagementVidyasagar UniversityPaschim MedinipurIndia

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