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The Role of the Registered Dietitian in the Management of the Bariatric Patient

  • Vasanth Stalin
  • Megan Hammis
Chapter

Abstract

The Nutritionist/Registered Dietitian is a critical indispensable component of any good bariatric program. He/she will be intimately responsible for the preop and post-op nutritional support of the bariatric patient. Adequate education is provided by the Nutritionist about the various staged diets that the patients’ go through after bariatric surgery, in great detail. The Nutritionist also plays a key supporting role in identifying nutritional deficiencies both pre and post-op. The dietitian also helps the patients with shopping for foods and beverages and customizing their meal choices.

Keywords

Dietitian Diet Protein Calorie Bariatric 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Michigan UniversityMount PleasantUSA
  2. 2.St. Mary’s of Michigan Bariatric CenterSaginawUSA

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