Advertisement

Nanoplastic Impact on Human Health—A 3D Intestinal Model to Study the Interaction with Nanoplastic Particles

  • Roman LehnerEmail author
  • Alke Petri-Fink
  • Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Water book series (SPWA)

Abstract

Much attention has been paid in recent years to the fate of microplastics in the environment. Several studies have shown that microplastics can be taken up by a variety of organisms (e.g., fish, mussels, zooplankton, sea urchin, birds) and thus can cause adverse effects such as death due to ingestion and entanglement, as well as pro-inflammatory responses.

References

  1. 1.
    Lambert, S., Wagner, M.: Characterisation of nanoplastics during the degradation of polystyrene. Chemosphere 145, 265–268 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.11.078 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jambeck, J.R., Geyer, R., Wilcox, C., Siegler, T.R., Perryman, M., Andrady, A., et al.: Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean. Science 347, 768–771 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1260352 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Mattsson, K., Hansson, L.A., Cedervall, T.: Nano-plastics in the aquatic environment. Environ. Sci. Process. Impacts. 17, 1712–1721 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.1039/C5EM00227C CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Koelmans, A.A., Besseling, E., Shim, W.J.: Nanoplastics in the Aquatic Environment. Critical Review. Marine Anthropogenic Litter, pp. 325–40. Springer International Publishing, Cham (2015). doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16510-3_12
  5. 5.
    da Costa, J.P., Santos, P.S.M., Duarte, A.C., Rocha-Santos, T.: (Nano)plastics in the environment—sources, fates and effects. Sci. Total Environ. 566–567, 15–26 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.05.041 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Wright, S.L., Kelly, F.J.: Plastic and human health: a micro issue? Environ. Sci. Technol. 51, 6634–6647 (2017).  https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.7b00423 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    NJDEP: Human Health Impacts of Microplastics and Nanoplastics, pp. 1––23. (2016)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Forte, M., Iachetta, G., Tussellino, M., Carotenuto, R., Prisco, M., De Falco, M., et al.: Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Toxicol. In Vitro 31, 126–136 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2015.11.006 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Walczak, A.P., Kramer, E., Hendriksen, P.J.M., Tromp, P., Helsper, J.P.F.G., van der Zande, M., et al.: Translocation of differently sized and charged polystyrene nanoparticles in in vitro intestinal cell models of increasing complexity. Nanotoxicology 9, 453–461 (2015).  https://doi.org/10.3109/17435390.2014.944599 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Velzeboer, I., Kwadijk, C.J.A.F., Koelmans, A.A.: Strong sorption of PCBs to nanoplastics, microplastics, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes. Environ. Sci. Technol. 48, 4869–4876 (2014).  https://doi.org/10.1021/es405721v CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman Lehner
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alke Petri-Fink
    • 2
  • Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser
    • 1
  1. 1.Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of FribourgFribourgSwitzerland
  2. 2.Chemistry DepartmentUniversity of FribourgFribourgSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations