Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with youth is a well-recognized and widely adopted form of treatment. CBT bridges the research practice gap well. One of its strengths is a practical theory which facilitates the translation of bench science to bedside clinical applications. The approach is action-oriented and is committed to a problem-solving stance. This chapter offers an overview of CBT with youth. We begin with a discussion of the historical roots and theoretical underpinnings and, next, the empirical findings supporting CBT for depression, bipolar disorders, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trauma, disruptive behavior disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. The elements, or golden nuggets of treatment, which are common to all forms of CBT are described in the third section.

Keywords

Cognitive behavioral therapy Treatment Children Adolescents Evidence-based intervention 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious YouthPalo Alto UniversityPalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.ASPIRE Adolescent Intensive Outpatient ProgramChildren’s Hospital of Orange CountyOrangeUSA

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