An Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

  • Justin B. Leaf
  • Joseph H. Cihon
  • Julia L. Ferguson
  • Sara M. Weinkauf
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) refers to a systematic approach of understanding behavior. Deeply rooted in the early work of Thorndike, Watson, Pavlov, and Skinner on respondent and operant conditioning, ABA uses scientific observations and principles of behavior to improve and change behaviors of social interest. As a practice, ABA refers to the application of behavior analytic principles to improve socially important behaviors and is especially important in the field of developmental disabilities. Each year, more individuals with developmental disabilities, especially autism spectrum disorder, have some form of ABA therapy implemented into their treatment plans. This chapter provides an overview of the history, principles, and applications of applied behavior analysis in the developmental disabilities population.

Keywords

Applied behavior analysis Behavioral intervention Autism spectrum disorder Treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Justin B. Leaf
    • 1
  • Joseph H. Cihon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julia L. Ferguson
    • 1
  • Sara M. Weinkauf
    • 3
  1. 1.Autism Partnership FoundationSeal BeachUSA
  2. 2.Endicott CollegeBeverlyUSA
  3. 3.JBA InstituteAliso ViejoUSA

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