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Conceptual Models for IR and Organizational Intelligence

  • William E. KnightEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Knowledge Studies in Higher Education book series (KSHE, volume 4)

Abstract

From at least the time of the founding of the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) in 1965, the questions of what institutional research (IR) is, how it should be structured, and what its responsibilities should be seem to have been perpetual among IR practitioners, those it serves, and scholars of the profession (Knight, W. E. (2003). The primer for institutional research. Tallahassee: The Association for Institutional Research; Reichard, D. J. (2012). The history of institutional research. In R. Howard, G. McLaughlin, & W. Knight (Eds.), The handbook of institutional research (pp. 3–21). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass). As mentioned by Webber in Chap.  1, IR in the US is now a mature profession. In the 50+ years, a substantial number of writings document the fundamental principles that describe and the major strategies used to carry out its mission within higher education. What comes with a longer history is the ability to think broadly and conceptually about the meaning and value of the collective set of ideals, principles, and strategies that represent the IR profession. This chapter provides an overview of various ideas about the evolving role of IR, both in its mature status in the United States, and as it develops in response to unique decision support contexts worldwide.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ball State UniversityMuncieUSA

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