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Professional Development for IR Professionals: Middle East and North Africa

  • Gina CinaliEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Knowledge Studies in Higher Education book series (KSHE, volume 4)

Abstract

The past three decades have witnessed exponential growth in the number of higher education institutions in the MENA region – particularly in the oil rich countries of the Gulf region. Proliferation of “American-style” liberal arts institutions, accompanied by a quest for the coveted US accreditation have accentuated an awareness of the need for accurate and timely data presentation, often with concomitant increase in hiring of qualified institutional research personnel, who often serve as active partners in decision making processes. Long-standing regional appreciation of education, coupled with internal and external demands, create great opportunities for institutional research professionals who are called on to perform numerous, diverse tasks to ensure that evidence-based, data-driven decisions can be taken in a fast moving environment.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institutional Research and EffectivenessAl Akhawayn University in IfraneIfraneMorocco

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