Building Capacity in Institutional Research in South Africa

Chapter
Part of the Knowledge Studies in Higher Education book series (KSHE, volume 4)

Abstract

Higher education in South Africa continues to experience challenges in an ever-changing socio-political national context. Pressure points include responsiveness, institutional effectiveness and accountability, punctuated by decreased fiscal support from government and increasing student activism against perceived slow transformation from an apartheid and colonial history. Such a dynamic national context, set against a backdrop of global trends in IR, influences the roles and responsibilities of South African institutional researchers. It foregrounds the necessity of enhancing current skills, competencies, and mindsets to embrace change and its resultant institutional support demands. It also points to the need for acquiring new knowledge and skills, where these are found lacking. Ultimately, South African institutional researchers will need to continuously develop their capacity to actively and effectively support and influence institutional decision making, policies, and practices.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Higher Education Research ConsultantIndependentJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.Durban University of TechnologyDurbanSouth Africa

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