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International Policies that Support Inclusive Assessment

  • Michael DaviesEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

A number of macro-policy initiatives that support inclusive assessment have influenced international policies that promote access to inclusive assessment of students with disabilities. This chapter outlines these initiatives and then provides a framework to evaluate countries and their adherence to inclusive assessment policies and practices. Three countries – the United States, Australia, and mainland China – are then reviewed against this framework as examples of countries at different levels in their development and application of policy to achieve inclusive assessment from their own culture, interests, pressures, and priorities. These comparative cases are used to highlight strengths and weaknesses of systems and to explore how international advances can be made to improve legislation, policy, and practices related to inclusive assessment.

Keywords

Inclusive assessment Adjustments International policies Australia China The United States 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education and Professional StudiesGriffith UniversityBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Australian Institute of Professional CounsellorsGriffith UniversityBrisbaneAustralia

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