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Towards an Interaction Model for Interactive Narratives

  • Elin Carstensdottir
  • Erica Kleinman
  • Magy Seif El-Nasr
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10690)

Abstract

In the discussion of interactive narrative experiences and story-driven games, much of the current work has focused on analyzing and proposing models and frameworks based on narrative theory and ludology. However, the players’ experience and interaction with such narrative structure and content is a topic that is currently understudied in the field. Specifically, questions regarding how the player interacts and perceives the impact of their interaction on the story are currently unanswered. This paper presents a step towards defining an interaction model that can be used to design and compare how a user participates in an interactive narrative.

Keywords

Interactive narrative Interaction models Close reading Game analysis Narrative interaction patterns User experience 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding for this research was provided by the National Science Foundation Cyber-Human Systems under Grant No. 1526275.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elin Carstensdottir
    • 1
  • Erica Kleinman
    • 1
  • Magy Seif El-Nasr
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Computer and Information ScienceNortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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