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Language for Specific Purposes: Theory and Research

  • Emma Riordan
Chapter

Abstract

Language for Specific Purposes (LSP) has a long history in language teaching and learning. I describe the origins of LSP in the context of the paradigm shift towards learner-centred teaching in the 1970s and 1980s and the emergence of various perspectives on how ‘specific purposes’ can be defined. I discuss the definition of specific language sub-sets by focusing on the target situation and the practices of needs analysis for LSP curriculum design. I also outline in detail the research project on which the book is based. The study includes document analysis, teacher trainer interviews, teacher questionnaires and classroom observations. The rich data set lends weight to the arguments outlined in this book by giving relatable and insightful examples of the phenomena discussed.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emma Riordan
    • 1
  1. 1.German Department School of Languages, Literatures and CulturesUniversity College CorkCorkIreland

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