Advertisement

Singing: Global Indigeneity and Robert Burns

  • Nikki Hessell
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print book series (PERCP)

Abstract

Hessell contributes an innovative angle to global Burns studies by considering Māori translations of Burns’s verse. The chapter looks at the Māori journalist and preacher Reweti Kōhere’s translation of extracts from Burns’s poems to illustrate his regular newspaper articles in the 1920s and early 1930s. Hessell proposes that Kōhere deploys Burns’s songs, and in particular his lament “To Mary in Heaven,” to investigate the links between oral and written cultures in colonised contexts, making use of the similar predicament faced by Scots in Burns’s time.

References

  1. Alker, Sharon, Leith Davis, and Holly Faith Nelson, eds. 2012. Robert Burns and Transatlantic Culture. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  2. Best, Elsdon. 1924. The Maori as He Was: A Brief Account of Maori Life as It Was in Pre-European Days. Wellington: Dominion Museum.Google Scholar
  3. ———. 1905. Maori Eschatology: The Whare Potae (House of Mourning) and Its Lore; Being a Description of Many Customs, Beliefs, Superstitions, Rites, &c., Pertaining to Death and Burial Among the Maori People, as Also Some Account of Native Belief in a Spiritual World. Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand 38: 148–239.Google Scholar
  4. Bone, Drummond. 2011. Nostalgia in Burns and Byron. Byron Journal 39 (2): 97–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Boyle, A.M. 1985. The Ayrshire Book of Burns-Lore. Ayr: Alloway Publishing.Google Scholar
  6. Brown, Deidre. 1999. The Architecture of the School of Māori Arts and Crafts. The Journal of the Polynesian Society 108 (3): 241–276.Google Scholar
  7. Bueltmann, Tanja. 2011. Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850–1930. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Burns, Robert. 1985. The Letters of Robert Burns. Edited by J. DeLancey Ferguson and G. Ross Roy. 2 vols., 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. ———. 1968. The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns. Edited by James Kinsley. 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  10. ———. 1993. The Songs of Robert Burns. Edited by Donald A. Low. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  11. Carruthers, Gerard. 2009. Robert Burns and Slavery. In Fickle Man: Robert Burns in the 21st Century, ed. Johnny Rodger and Gerard Carruthers, 163–175. Dingwall: Sandstone Press.Google Scholar
  12. Chamberlain, J. Edward. 2000. “From Hand to Mouth: The Postcolonial Politics of Oral and Written Traditions.” In Reclaiming Indigenous Voice and Vision, ed. Marie Battiste, 124–141. Vancouver: UBC Press.Google Scholar
  13. Crawford, Robert. 2009. The Bard: Robert Burns, A Biography. London: Jonathan Cape.Google Scholar
  14. Crawford, Thomas. 1965. Burns: A Study of the Poems and Songs. 2nd ed. Edinburgh and London: Oliver and Boyd.Google Scholar
  15. ———. 1979. Society and the Lyric: A Study of the Song Culture of Eighteenth-Century Scotland. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press.Google Scholar
  16. Curnow, Jenifer. 2002. A Brief History of Maori-Language Newspapers. In Rere atu, taku manu! Discovering History, Language and Politics in Maori-Language Newspapers, ed. Jenifer Curnow, Ngapare Hopa, and Jane McRae, 17–41. Auckland: Auckland University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Curnow, Jenifer, Ngapare Hopa, and Jane McRae, eds. 2006. He Pitopito Kōrero nō te Perehi Māori: Readings from the Maori-Language Press. Auckland: Auckland University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Daiches, David. 1964. The Paradox of Scottish Culture: The Eighteenth-Century Experience. London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Davis, Leith. 2004. At ‘Sang About’: Scottish Song and the Challenge to British Culture. In Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism, ed. Leith Davis, Ian Duncan, and Janet Sorensen, 188–203. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. ———. 2009. Burns and Transnational Culture. In The Edinburgh Companion to Robert Burns, ed. Gerard Carruthers, 150–163. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  21. ———. 2000. From Fingal’s Harp to Flora’s Song: Scotland, Music and Romanticism. The Wordsworth Circle 31 (2): 93–97.Google Scholar
  22. Davis, Leith, Holly Faith Nelson, and Sharon Alker. 2012. ‘Ae [‘Electric’] Spark o’ Nature’s Fire’: Reading Burns Across the Atlantic. In Robert Burns and Transatlantic Culture, ed. Sharon Alker, Leith Davis, and Holly Faith Nelson, 1–15. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  23. Dewes, Te Kapunga. 1977. The Case for Oral Arts. In Te Ao Hurihuri the World Moves On: Aspects of Maoritanga, ed. Michael King. Rev. ed. Auckland: Methuen.Google Scholar
  24. Dick, James C. 1962. The Songs of Robert Burns and Notes on Scottish Songs by Robert Burns. Hatboro: Folklore Associates.Google Scholar
  25. Ericson-Roos, Catarina. 1977. The Songs of Robert Burns: A Study of the Unity of Poetry and Music. Studia Anglistica Upsaliensia 30. Uppsala: Almqvist and Wiksell.Google Scholar
  26. Evening Post [Wellington, NZ]. 1912. Celtic Club. October 25.Google Scholar
  27. Fielding, Penny. 2004. Burns’s Topographies. In Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism, ed. Leith Davis, Ian Duncan, and Janet Sorensen, 170–187. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  28. ———. 2008. Scotland and the Fictions of Geography: North Britain, 1760–1830. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Gerson, Carole, and Susan Wilson. 2012. The Presence of Robert Burns in Victorian and Edwardian Canada. In Robert Burns and Transatlantic Culture, ed. Sharon Alker, Leith Davis, and Holly Faith Nelson, 117–130. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  30. Groom, Nick. 2006. ‘The Purest English’: Ballads and the English Literary Dialect. Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 47 (2/3): 179–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Hechter, Michael. 1999. Internal Colonialism: The Celtic Fringe in British National Development. Rev. ed. New Brunswick and London: Transaction.Google Scholar
  32. Hulan, Renée, and Eigenbrod Renate, eds. 2008. Aboriginal Oral Traditions: Theory, Practice, Ethics. Halifax and Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing.Google Scholar
  33. Jack, R.D.S. 2011. Translating Burns: The Bibliography of Scottish Literature in Translation: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives. In Robert Burns in Global Culture, ed. Murray Pittock, 156–171. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Jacks, William. 1896. Robert Burns in Other Tongues: A Critical Review of the Translations of the Songs and Poems of Robert Burns. Glasgow: James MacLehose.Google Scholar
  35. Kinsley, James. 1975. The Music of the Heart. In Critical Essays on Robert Burns, ed. Donald A. Low, 124–136. London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  36. Kōhere, Rarawa. 1996. Kohere, Reweti Tūhorouta—Biography. The Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Accessed November 14, 2012. http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/3k18/1.
  37. Kōhere, Reweti T. 1951a. The Autobiography of a Maori. Wellington: Reed.Google Scholar
  38. ———. 1951b. He Konae Aronui: Maori Proverbs and Sayings. Wellington: Reed.Google Scholar
  39. ———. 1927a. He Kupu Tohunga [Wise Sayings]. Te Toa Takitini, 558–560, March.Google Scholar
  40. ———. 1924a. He Kupu Tohunga [Wise Sayings]. Te Toa Takitini, 116–119, October.Google Scholar
  41. ———. 1931a. He Kupu Tohunga [Wise Sayings]. Te Toa Takitini, 37–39, September.Google Scholar
  42. ———. 1931b. Ich Dien. Te Toa Takatini, 49–50, October–November.Google Scholar
  43. ———. 1927b. Ki a Meri i te Rangi [To Mary in Heaven]. Te Toa Takitini, 669–671, October.Google Scholar
  44. ———. 1931c. Nga Kupu a Anaru Kaneki, Te Mea Nui Ake I Ana Miriona [The Sayings of Andrew Carnegie Are Worth More Than His Millions]. Te Toa Takitini, 69–71, December.Google Scholar
  45. ———. 1924b. Nga Tangata Rongo-Nui o Te Pakeha [The Famous People of the Pakeha]. Te Toa Takitini, 68–70, July.Google Scholar
  46. ———. 1931d. Tatau! Tatau! Te Toa Takitini, 50–53, October–November.Google Scholar
  47. Langan, Celeste. 2005. “Scotch Drink and Irish Harps: Mediations of the National Air.” In The Figure of Music in Nineteenth-Century British Poetry, ed. Phyllis Weliver, 25–49. Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  48. Leask, Nigel. 2011. ‘Their Groves o’ Sweet Myrtles’: Robert Burns and the Scottish Colonial Experience. In Robert Burns in Global Culture, ed. Murray Pittock, 172–188. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Low, Donald A., ed. 1974. Robert Burns: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  50. Mackay, Pauline, and Murray Pittock. 2011. Beyond Text: Burns, Byron and Their Material Culture Afterlife. Byron Journal 39 (2): 149–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. ———. 2012. Highland Mary: Objects and Memories. Romanticism 18 (2): 191–203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Mathison, Hamish. 2007. Robert Burns and National Song. In Scotland, Ireland, and the Romantic Aesthetic, ed. David Duff and Catherine Jones, 77–92. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  53. McCall, Sophie. 2011. First Person Plural: Aboriginal Storytelling and the Ethics of Collaborative Authorship. Vancouver: UBC Press.Google Scholar
  54. McClure, J. Derrick. 1997. Burns in Japanese. In Love and Liberty. Robert Burns: A Bicentenary Celebration, ed. Kenneth Simpson, 87–104. East Linton: Tuckwell Press.Google Scholar
  55. ———. 2004. Gaelic Translations of Burns. Studies in Scottish Literature: 33, 263–34, 280.Google Scholar
  56. McCue, Kirsteen. 1997. Burns, Women, and Song. In Robert Burns and Cultural Authority, ed. Robert Crawford, 40–57. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  57. McGuirk, Carol. 2012. Burns and Aphorism; or, Poetry into Proverb: His Persistence in Cultural Memory Beyond Scotland. In Robert Burns and Transatlantic Culture, ed. Sharon Alker, Leith Davis, and Holly Faith Nelson, 169–186. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  58. ———. 1994. Burns and Nostalgia. In Burns Now, ed. Kenneth Simpson, 31–69. Edinburgh: Canongate Press.Google Scholar
  59. ———. 1997a. “Haunted by Authority: Nineteenth-Century American Constructions of Robert Burns and Scotland.” In Robert Burns and Cultural Authority, ed. Robert Crawford, 136–158. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  60. ———. 1997b. Loose Canons: Milton and Burns, Artsong and Folksong. In Love and Liberty. Robert Burns: A Bicentenary Celebration, ed. Kenneth Simpson, 315–325. East Linton: Tuckwell Press.Google Scholar
  61. McIlvanney, Liam. 2002. Burns the Radical: Poetry and Politics in Late Eighteenth Century Scotland. East Linton: Tuckwell Press.Google Scholar
  62. ———. 2014. The Visionary Voyages of Robert Burns. In Jacobitism, Enlightenment and Empire, 1680–1820, ed. Allan I. Macinnes and Douglas J. Hamilton, 173–191. London: Pickering and Chatto.Google Scholar
  63. McLane, Maureen. 2008. Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  64. McNally, Michael D. 2000. Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  65. McRae, Jane, and Hēni Jacob. 2011. Ngā Mōteatea: An Introduction/He Kupu Arataki. Auckland: Auckland University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Mead, Hirini Moko, and Neil Grove. 2001. Ngā Pēpeha a ngā Tīpuna: The Sayings of the Ancestors. Wellington: Victoria University Press.Google Scholar
  67. Mergenthal, Silvia. 2011. Burns and European Identities. In Robert Burns in Global Culture, ed. Murray Pittock, 63–72. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  68. Metge, Joan. 1976. The Maoris of New Zealand. Rev. ed. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  69. Mitcalfe, Barry. 1974. The Singing Word: Maori Poetry. Wellington: Victoria University Press.Google Scholar
  70. Morris, David B. 1987. Burns and Heteroglossia. The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 28 (1): 3–27.Google Scholar
  71. Mulholland, James. 2013. Sounding Imperial: Poetic Voice and the Politics of Empire, 1730–1820. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  72. Newman, Steve. 2015. Localizing and Globalizing Burns’s Songs from Ayrshire to Calcutta: The Limits of Romanticism and Analogies of Improvement. In Global Romanticism: Origins, Orientations, and Engagements, 1760–1820, ed. Evan Gottlieb, 57–77. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  73. Ngata, A. T., ed. 1959. Ngā Mōteatea: The Songs, Scattered Pieces from Many Canoe Areas. 3 vols. Wellington: The Polynesian Society.Google Scholar
  74. Orbell, Margaret, ed. 1991. Waiata: Māori Songs in History. Auckland: Reed Books.Google Scholar
  75. Paterson, Lachy. 2014. Visual Identity in Niupepa Maori Nameplates and Title-Pages: From Traditional to Aspirational. Script & Print 38 (2): 67–79.Google Scholar
  76. Patterson, Brad, Tom Brooking, Jim McAloon, Rebecca Lenihan, and Tanja Bueltmann. 2013. Unpacking the Kists: The Scots in New Zealand. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press.Google Scholar
  77. Pittock, Murray. 2011a. “Introduction: Global Burns.” In Robert Burns in Global Culture, ed. Murray Pittock, 13–24. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  78. ———. ed. 2011b. Robert Burns in Global Culture. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press.Google Scholar
  79. Poverty Bay Herald. 1914. A Night Wi’ Burns, January 27.Google Scholar
  80. Trumpener, Katie. 1997. Bardic Nationalism: The Romantic Novel and the British Empire. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikki Hessell
    • 1
  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations