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Ceci n’est pas une Pratique: A Commentary

  • Rina ZazkisEmail author
Chapter
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Part of the ICME-13 Monographs book series (ICME13Mo)

Abstract

I highlight the main issues discussed in the chapters and wonder about the effect of engaging with representations of practice on actual teaching practice. I offer avenues for future studies in which representations of practice are designed by teachers, rather than researchers and teacher educators.

Keywords

Teaching practice Lesson play Scripting 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Simon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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