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A Situated Approach to Assess Teachers’ Professional Competencies Using Classroom Videos

Part of the ICME-13 Monographs book series (ICME13Mo)

Abstract

Teaching practice and its representation by videos are a central part of many empirical studies concerning the field of teaching and learning. In order to analyze how videos can help to investigate aspects of teachers’ expertise, the data from 131 primary mathematics teachers who participated in the TEDS-Follow-Up study were evaluated. The teachers answered questions referring to scripted video-clips describing classroom situations. The questions were qualitatively analyzed covering the spectrum of aspects mentioned by the teachers and its relation to aspects of teachers’ expertise. The analyses showed that teachers notice and mention a great number of aspects that were either directly observable in the video-clip shown, or could be identified using the given information. In addition, it is pointed out that teachers with high professional knowledge notice possible reasons for a student’s error more accurately, while teachers with low professional knowledge focus on aspects that are not directly connected to the student’s learning.

Keywords

  • Teacher competence
  • Video based assessment
  • Noticing
  • Teacher knowledge

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Fig. 1

Reproduced with permission from Blömeke et al. (2015), © 2015 Hogrefe Publishing

Fig. 2
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Fig. 4
Fig. 5

Notes

  1. 1.

    For a detailed description of the theoretical base and conceptualizations in the TEDS-M study, see e.g., Blömeke et al. (2014); for the TEDS-Follow-Up study e.g., Hoth et al. (2016a), Kaiser et al. (2015).

  2. 2.

    Pentominoes are plane geometric figures that consist of five squares. Each of those squares must be connected to at least one other square with one side. Figures with four squares are called Tetrominos etc. For more information about Pentominoes see Golomb (1994).

  3. 3.

    For further details about the instruments and the scaling of the TEDS-M study see Tatto et al. (2012).

  4. 4.

    There were three open response fields in the web-based test.

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Hoth, J., Kaiser, G., Döhrmann, M., König, J., Blömeke, S. (2018). A Situated Approach to Assess Teachers’ Professional Competencies Using Classroom Videos. In: Buchbinder, O., Kuntze, S. (eds) Mathematics Teachers Engaging with Representations of Practice. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70594-1_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70594-1_3

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