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Postindustrial Space: Integration of Green Infrastructure in the Center, Middle and Periphery of the City

  • E. Yu. ZaykovaEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Geography book series (SPRINGERGEOGR)

Abstract

Industrial areas occupy about 18,800 ha; more than 19% of Moscow [7]. These areas consist of former production zones and abandoned landscapes with numerous warehouses and dumping grounds. More than 4300 hectares of the industrial areas will be revitalized in the near future. The first stages of construction have already begun, with projects such as “Tushinsky Airfield” and “ZIL”. Other projects that are planned for construction over the next three-five years include: “Altufyevskoye Shosse”, “Silikatnye Ulitsy”, “Ogorodny Proyezd”, “Magistralnye Ulitsy”, “Severyanin”, “Yuzhny Port”, and “Paveletskaya”. These reconstructions provide an opportunity for sustainable development of new housing and social infrastructure with the restoration of natural ecosystems in the city. Designing in harmony with nature generates the potential for dynamic development of a resilient city [2]. This approach would alter the expansive and strictly-industrial areas into a “green and blue” city framework with natural water features and green areas. Incorporation of this spatial structure model would enhance city development at all levels; effectively stimulating the economy of the Moscow region. To achieve sustainable urbanization, it is necessary to use innovative restorative design; incorporating modern construction technologies while creating harmony and preserving heritage, to optimize forest areas, water areas, and open spaces, ultimately benefitting recreation, community-building, residential and office clusters [15].

Keywords

Sustainable urbanism Resilient city Post-industrial area Biourbanism Means of environment identity Central Middle and periphery of the city Green and blue frame Landscape urbanism 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Agrarian-Technological InstituteRUDN UniversityMoscowRussia

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