Biographia 1847: Plagiarism, Literary Property and Dialogic Authorship

  • Robin Schofield
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines Sara Coleridge’s critical engagement with STC’s authorship as editor of Biographia Literaria. Her major editorial task is to respond to severe charges that STC plagiarized extensively from the German philosopher Friedrich Schelling. STC’s plagiarisms are placed in the context of contemporary debates about literary property and the Copyright Act of 1842. Schofield examines the remarkable—at times startling—openness with which Sara Coleridge reveals the extent and blatancy of STC’s plagiarisms, and her frank analysis of the cognitive and affective weaknesses which, she believes, were their cause. This chapter concludes by considering why Sara Coleridge’s analysis of STC’s literary limitations is the pivotal point of her literary career, and decisive in the development of her vocation of religious authorship.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Schofield
    • 1
  1. 1.OxfordUK

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