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Supporting Sustainable Policy and Practices for Online Learning Education

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Climate Literacy and Innovations in Climate Change Education

Part of the book series: Climate Change Management ((CCM))

Abstract

This chapter describes an approach to the adoption of online learning in Higher Education. It is particularly relevant for readers interested in Online and Distance Learning initiatives that enact an agenda of climate change education through being sustainable and future proof. We present a pathway for ensuring sustainable educational initiatives, drawing from research that identifies crucial factors in this endeavour. In particular, it addresses how the adoption of Online and Distance Learning can be used as a catalyst for changing the pedagogical paradigm of universities and how this change may impact on the development of new policies and guidelines. In this chapter we report on how policy, guidelines and professional development can be designed for sustainable and consistent learning design and teaching practices.

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Correspondence to Diogo Casanova .

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Casanova, D., Price, L., Avery, B. (2018). Supporting Sustainable Policy and Practices for Online Learning Education. In: Azeiteiro, U., Leal Filho, W., Aires, L. (eds) Climate Literacy and Innovations in Climate Change Education. Climate Change Management. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70199-8_19

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-70199-8_19

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  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-70199-8

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