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The Structure and Nature of the Nigerian State

  • Adeoye O. Akinola
Chapter
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Part of the African Histories and Modernities book series (AHAM)

Abstract

This chapter employs a holistic approach to understanding the character of the Nigerian state, and examines the role of successive political regimes in responding to the pressures associated with globalization and the demands for sustainable democracy. It explores the evolution of Nigerian statehood and provides an overview of the composition, structure and character of the state, as well as an examination of the different variables affecting the quality of governance in Nigeria. The lack of capacity and underdevelopment in the Nigerian state go beyond the orthodox propositions of both modernization and dependency theories. The two theories attribute Africa’s crisis to internal variables (modernization) and external contradictions (dependency); rather, a multiplicity of contradictions explain the Nigeria’s state inability to promote good governance.

Keywords

State’s capacity Political leadership Good governance Underdevelopment Nigeria 

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adeoye O. Akinola
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public AdministrationUniversity of ZululandKwaDlangezwaSouth Africa

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