Conclusion

Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education book series (MULT, volume 24)

Abstract

The rapidly increasing profile of English in communication in Asia has given rise to some concerns about the integrity both of Asian languages and about the frameworks which have been applied to the study of intercultural communication in Asia. However, as the chapters in this volume have shown, research on interpersonal intercultural communication is beginning to yield an enhanced understanding of Asian values, content and strategies. In particular, research on intercultural communication within Asia is beginning to reflect new perspectives on Asian contexts in terms of empirical studies, theories and methodologies, and more nuanced conceptual frameworks. Seeing active intercultural communicating as being the result of emergent values and negotiated strategies and solutions points the way to an understanding of intercultural communication in Asia which more prominently reflects Asian values, with important implications for education and the new ways in which intercultural communication is being conceptualized today.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Languages and Cultures, and Institute for Teaching and Learning InnovationThe University of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  2. 2.Graduate School of EducationAnaheim UniversityAnaheimUSA

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