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Teaching Science to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Over the past decade, education reform has focused heavily on improving scientific literacy for all students through the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics movement. Despite this focus, scientific literacy remains a challenge for students across the nation. For students with autism spectrum disorder, these mandates have the potential to lead to improved academic performance in the classroom as well as improved post-school outcomes in relation to better job opportunities and the potential for higher wages. This chapter outlines the evidence-based practices and research-based practices that have demonstrated effectiveness in providing high-quality science instruction for students with autism spectrum disorder and provides examples of how to implement these strategies within an inclusive science classroom setting. Finally, implications for providing science instruction and recommendations for progressing science instruction for this population of students are discussed.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Science, Technology, Engineering And Mathematics (STEM) Progressive Time Delay Task Analytic Instruction Skilled Science Teachers 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mississippi State UniversityStarkvilleUSA

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