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Foundations and Development of Curriculum

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Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

The key to effective intervention lies with a well-designed curriculum. This chapter presents information regarding foundations of curriculum, components of curriculum, development of curriculum, and commercially published curriculum. Practitioners who are interested in developing curricula for learners with autism spectrum disorder may find the information presented in this chapter useful.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MacauTaipaMacau

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