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A Survival Analysis of Source Files Modified by New Developers

  • Hirohisa Aman
  • Sousuke Amasaki
  • Tomoyuki Yokogawa
  • Minoru Kawahara
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 10611)

Abstract

This paper proposes an application of the survival analysis to bug-fix events occurred in source files. When a source file is modified, it has a risk of creating a bug (fault). In this paper, such a risk is analyzed from a viewpoint of the survival time—the time that the source file can survive without any bug fix. Through an empirical study with 100 open source software (OSS) projects, the following findings are reported: (1) Source files modified by new developers have about \(26\%\) shorter survival time than the others. (2) The above tendency may be inverted if the OSS project has more developers relative to the total number of source files.

Keywords

Open source development Survival analysis Time to bug fix 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI #16K00099. The authors would like to thank the anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirohisa Aman
    • 1
  • Sousuke Amasaki
    • 2
  • Tomoyuki Yokogawa
    • 2
  • Minoru Kawahara
    • 1
  1. 1.Ehime UniversityMatsuyamaJapan
  2. 2.Okayama Prefectural UniversitySoja, OkayamaJapan

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