Using Activity Theory in Designing Science Inquiry Games

Chapter

Abstract

It’s been widely recognized that students in middle and high schools are often disengaged in the didactic science classrooms. Game-based learning has the potential to better engage students in meaningful learning. This chapter describes the design and development of a scenario-based science inquiry game using Activity Theory as a design framework. Evaluation results showed that both teachers and students perceived the science inquiry game positively in increasing the students’ situational interests and cognitive learning through active real-world problem-solving activities in a fun and concrete context.

Keywords

Game-based learning Science inquiry Activity Theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of South FloridaTampaUSA

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