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Media Multitasking and Mental Health

Abstract

Multitasking—or task switching—has become a necessary function of modern life. Multitasking with media is a common practice among young people, who report its ease yet perform worse on individual tasks when they attempt to multitask. Adolescent media multitasking may be both adaptive and maladaptive and include prosocial outcomes and/or negative mental health problems including depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. This chapter examines the relationship between media multitasking and adolescent mental health.

Keywords

  • Multitasking
  • Task switching
  • Well-being
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep disorders

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Cheever, N.A., Peviani, K., Rosen, L.D. (2018). Media Multitasking and Mental Health. In: Moreno, M., Radovic, A. (eds) Technology and Adolescent Mental Health . Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69638-6_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69638-6_8

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