Rhetoric of Obedience and Self-Sacrifice in Confucianism and Christianity

  • Jaeyeon Lucy Chung
Chapter
Part of the Asian Christianity in the Diaspora book series (ACID)

Abstract

The moral values of obedience and self-sacrifice have deeply impacted the formation and development of Korean women’s self-esteem. Because of the particular influence of Confucianism and Christianity on their social patterns as well as cultural anthropologies, this chapter deals with the values of obedience and self-sacrifice in these two religio-cultural traditions. Specifically, it investigates how Confucianism and Christianity shape Korean women’s sense of self-esteem and relationship. First, it analyzes the language of obedience in Confucianism, which is used to maintain the relational hierarchy and the subordinated status of women. Then, it explores the traditional understanding of Christianity, which identifies self-pride as a primary sin and self-sacrifice as a central virtue.

Keywords

Obedience Confucianism Relationship Self-pride Self-sacrifice Agape Mutuality Christianity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaeyeon Lucy Chung
    • 1
  1. 1.Garrett-Evangelical Theological SeminaryEvanstonUSA

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