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Energy-Efficient Ship Operation: The Concept of Green Manoeuvring

  • Michael BaldaufEmail author
  • Knud Benedict
  • Matthias Kirchhoff
  • Michèle Schaub
  • Michael Gluch
  • Sandro Fischer
Chapter
Part of the WMU Studies in Maritime Affairs book series (WMUSTUD, volume 5)

Abstract

Energy-efficient operation of ships focusses on economical use of fuel. Consumption of fuel in shipping causes costs and pollutes the environment. ‘Green Manoeuvring’ refers to ship handling in an environmentally friendly manner, meaning, using the settings for controlling a ship’s movement in a way that emissions of nitric and sulphur oxides (NOx SOx) and particles are as low as reasonably possible and, as a side effect, also save fuel. Positive effects of efficient manoeuvring can be supported by comprehensive pre-planning of complex manoeuvres as e.g. when entering ports and approaching the berth. This chapter introduces new technology and how it might be used for ‘Green Manoeuvring’.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Some of the materials presented in this chapter were partly achieved in the frame of funded research projects. Firstly to mention the project “Simulation-based training module to promote green energy-efficient ship operation” (ProGreenShip). ProGreenShip was a capacity building research project of IAMU kindly supported by the International Association of Maritime Universities (IAMU) and The Nippon Foundation in Japan.

Further research work is undertaken and partly resulted from “MEmBran – Modelling of Emissions and Fuel Consumption during Manoeuvring Operation of Ships” and “MTCAS – electronic maritime collision avoidance”, which are funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (Germany), “Multi Media for Improvement of MET” (MultiSimManGREEN), funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, surveyed by Research Centre Juelich PTJ and German Aerospace Agency. Finally, on-going work that contributes to the presented studies belongs partly to WMU’s project on further development and implementation of the e-Navigation concept funded by Korea Research Institute Ships & Ocean Engineering (KRISO) as well as the European project for research and technological development “OpenRisk”, co-financed by the EU – Civil Protection Financial Instrument as project 2016/PREV/26.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Baldauf
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Knud Benedict
    • 2
  • Matthias Kirchhoff
    • 2
  • Michèle Schaub
    • 2
  • Michael Gluch
    • 2
  • Sandro Fischer
    • 2
  1. 1.World Maritime UniversityMalmöSweden
  2. 2.Department of Maritime Studies, Institute of Innovative Ship Simulation and Maritime Systems (ISSIMS)Hochschule Wismar, University of Applied Sciences: Technology, Business and DesignRostockGermany

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