The Wide Reverse, Cognition and Affect

  • James Mairata
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines how Spielberg constructs his narratives through the lens of cognitivism and related emotion ‘theory’. At the same time, this chapter is not designed to provide an exhaustive summary of current cognitive and affective theory. Rather, its purpose is to provide an introductory overview of some of the more pertinent concepts, debates and findings that are relevant to the consideration of style and its function in Spielberg’s films.

References

  1. Anderson, J. D. (1996). The Reality of Illusion: An Ecological Approach to Cognitive Film Theory. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Aumont, J. (1997). The Image (C. Pajackowska, Trans.). London: British Film Institute.Google Scholar
  3. Bacon, H. (2011). The Extent of Mental Completion of Films. Projections, 5(2), 1–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bartsch, A. (2008). Meta-Emotion: How Films and Music Videos Communicate Emotions About Emotions. Projections, 2(1), 45–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Berliner, T., & Cohen, D. J. (2011). The Illusion of Continuity: Active Perception and the Classical Editing System. Journal of Film and Video, 63(1), 44–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bordwell, D. (1985). Narration and the Fiction Film. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Bordwell, D. (1988). Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Bordwell, D. (1989). A Case for Cognitivism. Iris, 9, 11–40.Google Scholar
  9. Branigan, E. (1984). Point of View in the Cinema. Berlin: Mouton Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Brown, W. (2011). Resisting the Psycho-Logic of Intensified Continuity. Projections, 5(1), 69–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Buckland, W. (2006). Directed by Steven Spielberg: Poetics of the Contemporary Hollywood Blockbuster. New York: Continuum.Google Scholar
  12. Carroll, N. (1990). The Philosophy of Horror or Paradoxes of the Heart. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Carroll, N. (1996). Theorizing the Moving Image. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Carroll, N. (2003). Engaging the Moving Image. New Haven: Yale University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Carroll, N. (2008). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures. Singapore: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
  16. Carroll, N. (2013). Minerva’s Night Out: Philosophy, Pop Culture, and Moving Pictures. Malaysia: Wiley Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Carroll, N., & Carroll, P. (1986). Notes on Movie Music. Studies in the Literary Imagination 19(1), 73–81.Google Scholar
  18. Cutting, J. E. (2005). Perceiving Scenes in Film and in the World. In J. D. Anderson & B. F. Anderson (Eds.), Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations (pp. 9–27). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Eder, J. (2010). Understanding Characters. Projections, 4(1), 18–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Eidsvik, C. (2005). Background Tracks in Recent Cinema. In J. D. Anderson & B. F. Anderson (Eds.), Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations (pp. 70–78). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Freeland, C. (2012). Continuity, Narrative and Cross-Modal Cuing of Attention. Projections, 6(1), 34–41.Google Scholar
  22. Gaut, B. (1999). Identification and Emotion in Narrative Film. In C. Plantinga & G. M. Smith (Eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion (pp. 200–236). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Grodal, T. (1997). Moving Pictures: A New Theory of Film Genres, Feelings, and Cognition. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Grodal, T. (2009). Embodied Visions: Evolution, Emotion, Culture and Film. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Hall, S., & Neale, S. (2010). Epics Spectacles and Blockbusters. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Hochberg, J., & Brooks, V. (1996). Movies in the Mind’s Eye. In D. Bordwell & N. Carroll (Eds.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies (pp. 368–387). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  27. Hochberg, J., & Brooks, V. (2007). Film Cutting and Visual Momentum. In M. A. Peterson, B. Gillam, & H. A. Sedgwick (Eds.), In the Mind’s Eye: Julian Hochberg on the Perception of Pictures, Films, and the World (pp. 206–228). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Hogan, P. C. (2007). Sensorimotor Projection, Violations of Continuity, and Emotion in the Experience of Film. Projections, 1(1), 41–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Huff, M., & Schwan, S. (2012). Do Not Cross the Line: Heuristic Spatial Updating in Dynamic Scenes. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 19(6), 1065–1072. Retrieved from EBSCOhost MEDLINE Complete CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Konigsberg, I. (2007). Film Studies and the New Science. Projections, 1(1), 1–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Kovacs, A. B. (2011). Causal Understanding and Narration. Projections, 5(1), 51–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Kraft, R. N. (1987). The Influence of Camera Angle on Comprehension and Retention of Pictorial Events. Memory and Cognition, 15(4), 291–307. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/article/10.3758%2FBF03197032#page-1 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Levin, D. T., & Wang, C. (2009). Spatial Representation in Cognitive Science and Film. Projections, 3(1), 24–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Levinson, J. (1996). Film Music and Narrative Agency. In D. Bordwell & N. Carroll (Eds.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies (pp. 248–282). Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  35. Magliano, J. P., & Sacks, J. M. (2011). The Impact of Continuity Editing in Narrative Film on Event Segmentation. Cognitive Science, 35(8), 1489–1517. Retrieved from EBSCOhost Education Research Complete.
  36. McGinn, C. (2005). The Power of Movies: How Screen and Mind Interact. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
  37. Morris, N. (2007). The Cinema of Steven Spielberg Empire of Light. London: Wallflower Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Murch, W. (2001). In the Blink of an Eye: A Perspective on Film Editing (2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Silman-James Press.Google Scholar
  39. Neill, A. (1996). Empathy and (Film) Fiction. In D. Bordwell & N. Carroll (Eds.), Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies (pp. 175–194). Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  40. Oliver, M. B., & Hartman, T. (2010). Exploring the Role of Meaningful Experiences in Users’ Appreciation of ‘Good Movies’. Projections, 4(2), 128–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Plantinga, C. (1999). The Scene of Empathy and the Human Face on Film. In C. Plantinga & G. M. Smith (Eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion (pp. 239–256). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Plantinga, C. (2009a). Moving Viewers: American Film and the Spectator’s Experience. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  43. Plantinga, C. (2009b). Trauma, Pleasure and Emotion in the Viewing of Titanic, A Cognitive Approach. In W. Buckland (Ed.), Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies (pp. 237–256). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Plantinga, C. (2009c). Emotion and Affect. In P. Livingston & C. Plantinga (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film (pp. 86–96). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  45. Prince, S. (2012). Digital Visual Effects in Cinema. New Jersey: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Rogers, S. (2012). Auteur of Attention: The Filmmaker as Cognitive Scientist. Projections, 6(1), 42–48.Google Scholar
  47. Shone, T. (2004). Blockbuster. London: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
  48. Smith, M. (1995). Engaging Characters. London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Smith, G. M. (1999a). Local Emotions, Global Moods, and Film Structure. In C. Plantinga & G. M. Smith (Eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion (pp. 103–126). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Smith, J. (1999b). Movie Music as Moving Music: Emotion, Cognition and the Film Score. In C. Plantinga & G. M. Smith (Eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion (pp. 146–167). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Smith, G. M. (2003). Film Structure and the Emotion System. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Smith, T. J. (2005). An Attentional Theory of Continuity Editing. [Unpublished PhD Thesis]. University of Edinburgh.Google Scholar
  53. Smith, G. M. (2012a). Continuity Is Not Continuous. Projections, 6(1), 56–61.Google Scholar
  54. Smith, T. J. (2012b). The Attentional Theory of Cinematic Continuity. Projections, 6(1), 1–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Tan, E. S. (1996). Emotion and the Structure of Narrative Film: Film as an Emotion Machine. New Jersey: Lawrence Eribaum Associates Inc.Google Scholar
  56. Tan, E. S. (2005). Three Views of Facial Expression and Its Understanding in the Cinema. In J. D. Anderson & B. F. Anderson (Eds.), Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations (pp. 107–127). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  57. Tan, E. S., & Frijda, N. H. (1999). Sentiment in Film Viewing. In C. Plantinga & G. M. Smith (Eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion (pp. 48–64). Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  58. Zillman, D. (2005). Cinematic Creation of Emotion. In J. D. Anderson & B. F. Anderson (Eds.), Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations (pp. 164–180). Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar

Film Title Editions

  1. Ozu, Y. (Director). (1961). The End of Summer [Motion picture, DVD (2007)]. United States: The Criterion Collection.Google Scholar
  2. Spielberg, S. (Director). (1993). Jurassic Park [Motion picture, Blu-ray (2014)]. Australia: Universal Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Mairata
    • 1
  1. 1.Charles Sturt UniversitySydneyAustralia

Personalised recommendations