Hegel and Islam: Orientalism

  • M. A. R. Habib
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers a comprehensive treatment of Hegel’s assessment of Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, its philosophical traditions, its aesthetics, and its place in the history of philosophy and in world history generally. Hegel’s accounts of Islam adumbrate a long period of Western thinking about Islam that reaches into our own era. Islam, according to him, is characterized by caprice, lack of restraint, and fanaticism—all focused in an intrinsic impulse toward world conquest. Hegel did see Islam’s assertion of an utterly transcendent Divinity as an essential stage of world history but one which had to be superseded by a more dialectical conception of God as embodied in the Christian Trinity. In fact, he explicitly saw Islam as the “antithesis” of Christianity.

Keywords

Hegel and Islam Hegel on Islamic philosophy Hegel on Islamic poetry Islam and Christianity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. R. Habib
    • 1
  1. 1.Rutgers UniversityCamdenUSA

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