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Parenting and Positive Adjustment for Adolescents in Nine Countries

  • Jennifer E. LansfordEmail author
  • Suha M. Al-Hassan
  • Dario Bacchini
  • Marc H. Bornstein
  • Lei Chang
  • Bin-Bin Chen
  • Kirby Deater-Deckard
  • Laura Di Giunta
  • Kenneth A. Dodge
  • Patrick S. Malone
  • Paul Oburu
  • Ann T. Skinner
  • Concetta Pastorelli
  • Emma Sorbring
  • Laurence Steinberg
  • Grace Icenogle
  • Sombat Tapanya
  • Liane Peña Alampay
  • Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
  • Arnaldo Zelli
Chapter
  • 570 Downloads
Part of the Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology book series (CAPP, volume 12)

Abstract

This chapter describes the theoretical background, methodology, and select empirical findings from the Parenting Across Cultures project, a longitudinal study of mothers, fathers, and youth in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and United States). The design of the study is well suited to addressing questions regarding within-family, between-family within-country, and between-country predictors of youth outcomes. Positive development may be characterized in unique ways in different countries, but adjustment outcomes such as social competence, prosocial behavior, and academic achievement also share features and parenting predictors in different countries. Combining emic (originating within a culture) and etic (originating outside a culture) approaches, operationalizing culture, and handling measurement invariance are challenges of international research. Understanding culturally specific and generalizable features of positive youth development as well as how youth are socialized in ways to promote positive adjustment are advantages of comparative international research.

Keywords

Adolescence Culture International Parenting Positive development 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer E. Lansford
    • 1
    Email author
  • Suha M. Al-Hassan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dario Bacchini
    • 4
  • Marc H. Bornstein
    • 5
  • Lei Chang
    • 6
  • Bin-Bin Chen
    • 7
  • Kirby Deater-Deckard
    • 8
  • Laura Di Giunta
    • 9
  • Kenneth A. Dodge
    • 1
  • Patrick S. Malone
    • 1
  • Paul Oburu
    • 10
  • Ann T. Skinner
    • 1
  • Concetta Pastorelli
    • 9
  • Emma Sorbring
    • 11
  • Laurence Steinberg
    • 12
    • 13
  • Grace Icenogle
    • 12
  • Sombat Tapanya
    • 14
  • Liane Peña Alampay
    • 15
  • Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado
    • 16
  • Arnaldo Zelli
    • 17
  1. 1.Duke UniversityDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Hashemite UniversityZarqaJordan
  3. 3.Emirates College for Advanced EducationAbu DhabiUnited Arab Emirates
  4. 4.University of Naples Federico IINaplesItaly
  5. 5.Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentBethesdaUSA
  6. 6.University of MacauMacauChina
  7. 7.Fudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  8. 8.University of Massachusetts at AmherstAmherstUSA
  9. 9.Università di Roma “La Sapienza”RomeItaly
  10. 10.Maseno UniversityMasenoKenya
  11. 11.University WestTrollhättanSweden
  12. 12.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  13. 13.King Abdulaziz UniversityJeddahSaudi Arabia
  14. 14.Chiang Mai UniversityChiang MaiThailand
  15. 15.Ateneo de Manila UniversityQuezon CityPhilippines
  16. 16.Universidad San BuenaventuraMedellínColombia
  17. 17.University of Rome “Foro Italico”RomeItaly

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