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Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Fathers After a Newborn: When Worry Takes Over

Abstract

Excessive, disproportionate worry which interferes with psychosocial functioning characterizes Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD). The content of these worries can change from time to time, ranging from the simplest issues pertaining to daily chores, to health, work, finances or disasters. The worries seem to be more than what is warranted for the actual events, often resulting in severe apprehension; the individuals expect the worst when there is often no reason for concern. A person who is preoccupied with these irrational worries cannot “switch them off” and tends to ruminate over them in an unhealthy manner. Individuals with GAD find it difficult to focus or concentrate as the worries are generally distracting and persistent, leading to fatigue and exhaustion; they may complain of their mind “going blank”. Sufferers are often imprisoned in their own thoughts and are unable to engage in social or occupational functioning. Symptoms of irritability, insomnia and being on edge can cause further impairment.

Keywords

  • Excessive
  • Worry
  • Treatment
  • Intervention
  • Anxiety
  • First-time father
  • Identity

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Misri, S.K. (2018). Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Fathers After a Newborn: When Worry Takes Over. In: Paternal Postnatal Psychiatric Illnesses. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68249-5_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-68249-5_4

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