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Curiosity’s Science Cameras

  • Emily Lakdawalla
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

Curiosity has five science cameras. The color Mastcams view the rover’s world in color at two different resolutions. The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI, pronounced “Molly”) on the turret at the end of the arm, is a wide-angle color camera that can be held close to a target or perform distance imaging. The Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) is fixed to the rover body, pointing down, with a view of the surface as it passes under the rover. Together, these three instruments are often referred to as the “MMM” cameras. They have common detector and electronics and software design and differ only in their optics. Finally, there is the laser-equipped ChemCam, which measures elemental compositions of nearby rocks and also possesses the camera with the highest angular resolution on the rover, the Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). It will be described in Chapter 9 with the other composition analysis instruments.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emily Lakdawalla
    • 1
  1. 1.The Planetary SocietyPasadenaUSA

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