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Directions and Avenues of Geotourism—With Particular View to Nepal

  • Jörn H. Kruhl
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Natural Hazards book series (SPRINGERNAT)

Abstract

The paper briefly presents foundations and advantages of geotourism in theory and praxis. Research is mostly financed by public money and, therefore, the public should be informed about results of research. Such transfer needs to follow didactic rules. Beyond seminar rooms, geotourism is mainly based on geo-museums, geotopes and national and global geoparks. Geotourism as part of ecotourism and educational tourism is regarded as driving force behind the economic and cultural development of regions. Specifically a country like Nepal, with a limited industrial fundament, should make advantage of its rich geo-heritage. The paper reviews the geoscientific, economic and structural basis of geotourism in Nepal and its necessary design with respect to geo-hazards. Suggestions are made how geoscience transfer to the public can be performed, with special view on the Global Geopark Network, and which practical steps for successfully establishing geotourism in Nepal can be made. Finally, a key object is presented, which could serve as geotouristic focus of attraction: The Great Wall of Kathmandu.

Keywords

Geotourism Geopark Geodidactics Science transfer Nepal 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The present paper originated from a lecture given at the international conference (Humboldt Kolleg) “Living under Threat of Earthquake”, Kathmandu, February 2016, which was financially supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. In addition, it is partly based on teaching and research activities funded by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). During earlier years, the author strongly benefitted from Joseph Birkenhauer’s research on geodidactics and his great experience in and enthusiasm for transferring geoscience to the public.

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© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil, Geo and Environmental EngineeringTechnische Universität MünchenMunichGermany

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