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Water Efficient Maize for Africa: A Public-Private Partnership in Technology Transfer to Smallholder Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Mark Edge
  • Sylvester O. Oikeh
  • Denis Kyetere
  • Stephen Mugo
  • Kingstone Mashingaidze
Chapter
Part of the Innovation, Technology, and Knowledge Management book series (ITKM)

Abstract

Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) is a public-private partnership working to improve food security and rural livelihoods among smallholder farmers and their families in sub-Saharan Africa by developing and deploying new drought-tolerant and insect-pest-protected hybrid maize (corn) varieties. Maize is the most widely grown staple crop in Africa, where more than 300 million people depend on it as their main food source. Droughts, foliar diseases, and insect pests are intensifying food production problems in Africa, which makes for a vulnerable food security situation. Smallholder farmers in Africa, like farmers everywhere, want the choice to use the best tools and technologies available to minimize their risks and improve their lives.

References

  1. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 2016. Who We Are. http://www.gatesfoundation.org/Who-We-Are.
  2. Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT). 2016. About Us, Our History. http://www.cimmyt.org/organization/.
  3. Monsanto Company. 2016. Who We Are. http://www.monsanto.com/whoweare/pages/default.aspx.
  4. Paarlberg, Robert. 2008. Starved for Science: How Biotechnology Is Being Kept Out of Africa. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. ISBN 9780674033474. 149–177.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Edge
    • 1
  • Sylvester O. Oikeh
    • 2
  • Denis Kyetere
    • 2
  • Stephen Mugo
    • 3
  • Kingstone Mashingaidze
    • 4
  1. 1.Monsanto CompanySt. LouisUSA
  2. 2.African Agricultural Technology FoundationNairobiKenya
  3. 3.International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CYMMT)NairobiKenya
  4. 4.Agricultural Research Council Grain Crops InstitutePotchefstroomSouth Africa

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