‘New’ Feminisms in India: Encountering the ‘West’ and the Rest

  • Sushmita Chatterjee
Chapter

Abstract

The role of the ‘west’ in defining feminism in India has been the subject of many contestations and critiques. Conversing with different theorists, I look at instances of ‘new’ feminisms in India through initiatives such as Blank Noise, SlutWalk, and Pink Chaddi Campaign to question the meaning of the ‘west’ in Indian feminisms. Also, I turn to Mithu Sen’s exhibit (2016), which encourages us to rethink the construction of boundaries and geographical delimitations. Complicating the notion of space and ideological delineations, my essay theorizes on the ‘new’ and ‘west’ as complex interactions, which though seen as ostensibly western influenced could help push us towards a more nuanced analysis of power fabrics.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sushmita Chatterjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Appalachian State UniversityBooneUSA

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