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Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy

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Abstract

Feeding and gastrointestinal difficulties are common in children with cerebral palsy and if not appropriately managed can result in undernutrition, poor growth and worsened general health. Gastrointestinal difficulties include oropharyngeal dysfunction, drooling, foregut dysmotility and gastro-oesophageal reflux as a result of gastro-oesophageal dysmotility, retching, delayed gastric emptying and chronic constipation. The assessment and management of children with cerebral palsy and comorbid gastrointestinal problems are best performed within a multidisciplinary team experienced in the management of children with CP and gastrointestinal problems. This chapter considers the gastrointestinal problems experienced by children with cerebral palsy and outlines current management strategies.

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Oropharyngeal dysfunction
  • Gastrostomy
  • Foregut dysmotility
  • Gastro-oesophageal reflux
  • Delayed gastric emptying
  • Constipation

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Sullivan, P.B., Andrew, M.J. (2018). Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with Cerebral Palsy. In: Panteliadis, C. (eds) Cerebral Palsy. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67858-0_30

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67858-0_30

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