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Analysis: Considering Outcomes, Context, and Learners

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Abstract

Analysis is the initial stage of the WBID Model. At the beginning of this stage, problems are investigated and potential solutions are identified. If online instruction is considered the viable solution to the problem, the second phase is to analyze the four main instructional components within the situation: the instructional goal, instructional context, learners, and instructional content. The findings from these analyses provide the foundation for how the instruction will come to fruition.

This chapter begins with discussion of the first analysis phase, problem analysis. Included in this discussion is determining the causes, symptoms, and solutions and identifying the procedures for gap analysis. Next, we address the first three components of the instructional situation, examining their purposes, methods for gathering data, and procedures for documenting the findings. We devote Chap.  4 to a thorough discussion of the remaining analysis component, instructional content analysis, and the associated implications of the analysis process.

Keywords

Analysis Problem analysis Design document Instructional component analysis Instructional goal analysis Instructional context analysis Learner analysis Learner characteristics Instructional content analysis 

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Copyright information

©  Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Counseling and Instructional ScienceUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA
  2. 2.Division of Research and Strategic InnovationUniversity of West FloridaPensacolaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Educational TechnologyBoise State UniversityBoiseUSA

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