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A New Process to Evaluate the Risk of an Engine Power Drop Caused by Snow Particles

  • Christoph Huber
  • Heinrich Reister
  • Thomas Binner
  • Bernhard Weigand
Conference paper

Abstract

In cold and snowy regions roads are often covered with snow during the winter time. On these roads snow particles can be rolled up by vehicles and these particles can penetrate into the air intake system of the engine. As a result an engine power drop can occur. This paper discusses three different possibilities to evaluate the risk of such an engine power drop. One possibility is given by measurements on a natural testing area. The second possibility consists of measurements in a climatic wind tunnel and the third possibility is given by numerical simulations. As examples for the experimental testing a natural testing area in Arjeplog (Sweden) and two climatic wind tunnels in and near Stuttgart will be explained in more detail. Information for the snow particle generation, the snow particle size and the snow mass flux will be provided. Additionally to this experimental testing a method for the virtual testing will be presented. This method is based on an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach within a commercial CFD-software. The simulation method allows an approximate calculation of the snow amount, which penetrates into the air filter body.

In the past prototypes were built and measurements were carried out to evaluate the snow amount, which penetrates into the air filter body. These measurements were possible at a later stage of the vehicle development process. We suggest to introduce the simulation method in an earlier stage of the development process. Thereby the air intake system can reach a high level of maturity before first prototypes are built.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christoph Huber
    • 1
  • Heinrich Reister
    • 1
  • Thomas Binner
    • 1
  • Bernhard Weigand
    • 2
  1. 1.Daimler AGSindelfingenGermany
  2. 2.ITLRUniversity of StuttgartStuttgartGermany

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