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What Role Do Regions and European Identity Play in European Integration and Politics? An Introduction; Literature Review; Hypotheses and Chapters’ Outline

  • Julie Anna Braun
Chapter

Abstract

This first chapter is dedicated to setting the stage of the research project. It introduces the context of EU regions’ European engagement, as well as the role of European identity in regions’ European policies. This chapter identifies and explains regional reforms, which have contributed to both the expansion and contraction of regional political authority in European politics. Relevant research and its findings on the scope of regions’ European policies will also be presented; and preliminary positions on whether European identity plays a role within their European engagement and what impact this might have on European integration or disintegration will also be discussed. Throughout this book, steps leading to anti-EU sentiment and such outcomes as the vote for Brexit will be highlighted. The analysis will lay the groundwork for the definition of the research model by identifying gaps in our understanding of regional governments’ European engagement and the relationship between policy and practice. Finally, an overview of all chapters will be presented.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Anna Braun
    • 1
  1. 1.Hertie School of GovernanceBerlinGermany

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