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Blood Pressure Measurement: A Classic of Stress Measurement and Its Role in Technostress Research

Part of the Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation book series (LNISO,volume 25)

Abstract

In this paper, we present blood pressure measurement as an additional data collection method for technostress research. Considering that blood pressure is an important stress indicator and that, to the best of our knowledge, no prior Information Systems (IS) paper had an explicit focus on blood pressure measurement, the present paper is urgently needed, in particular from a technostress measurement perspective. We briefly describe the best practice in blood pressure measurement. Based on this foundation, we present a review of 15 empirical technostress studies that used blood pressure as a stress indicator. We find significant application variety in the extant literature, signifying the potential of blood pressure measurement for longitudinal technostress research. Yet, researchers should more explicitly adhere to international guidelines for the application of blood pressure measurement in future research, thereby securing data collection and data analysis quality.

Keywords

  • Technostress
  • Stress
  • Blood pressure
  • Self-measurement
  • NeuroIS

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-67431-5_4
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Notes

  1. 1.

    “mm Hg” or “millimeter of mercury” (in a mercury sphygmomanometer) is a unit used to define the pressure of bodily fluids, with 1 mm Hg = 0.00133 bar.

  2. 2.

    Search in ISI—Web of Science on 04/06/2017 using the query: Topic: “Blood pressure” AND Topic: “information technology” OR “information system” OR “human-computer interaction”, which resulted in 209 publications.

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Fischer, T., Halmerbauer, G., Meyr, E., Riedl, R. (2018). Blood Pressure Measurement: A Classic of Stress Measurement and Its Role in Technostress Research. In: Davis, F., Riedl, R., vom Brocke, J., Léger, PM., Randolph, A. (eds) Information Systems and Neuroscience. Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation, vol 25. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67431-5_4

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