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Decision Inertia and Arousal: Using NeuroIS to Analyze Bio-Physiological Correlates of Decision Inertia in a Dual-Choice Paradigm

Part of the Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation book series (LNISO,volume 25)

Abstract

Decision inertia is a cognitive process describing the reluctance to incorporate new information in choices, manifesting in the tendency to repeat previous choices regardless of the consequences. In this work, we discuss recent research in decision inertia, and show that inter-individual differences in arousal may play an important role for understanding decision inertia. We derive a NeuroIS framework for the operationalization of decision inertia, and discuss our conceptualization with a view towards a general theory of decision inertia.

Keywords

  • Decision inertia
  • Arousal
  • Multiple processes
  • Dual-choice paradigm

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Correspondence to Dominik Jung .

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Jung, D., Dorner, V. (2018). Decision Inertia and Arousal: Using NeuroIS to Analyze Bio-Physiological Correlates of Decision Inertia in a Dual-Choice Paradigm. In: Davis, F., Riedl, R., vom Brocke, J., Léger, PM., Randolph, A. (eds) Information Systems and Neuroscience. Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation, vol 25. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67431-5_18

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