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Beyond Traditional Neuroimaging: Can Mobile fNIRS Add to NeuroIS?

Part of the Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation book series (LNISO,volume 25)

Abstract

NeuroIS research has shown that the application of neuroimaging methods (e.g. fMRI) could add to our understanding of human–human and human–computer interaction. However, taking the specific constraints of some neuroimaging methods into account, there is an ongoing discussion regarding the application and implementation of existing and innovative neuroimaging methods. Against this background, this work introduces an innovative neuroimaging method, namely mobile functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) to NeuroIS. By indicating that mobile fNIRS appears to be a valid neuroimaging tool, our work aims to encourage researchers to utilise mobile fNIRS in the field of NeuroIS.

Keywords

  • fNIRS
  • NeuroIS
  • Mobile neuroimaging
  • Decision neuroscience

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the editorial board and the reviewers who provided insightful comments on earlier drafts of this chapter. Moreover, we would like to thank all of our colleagues who provided insights and expertise that greatly assisted the research work. In particular, we would like to thank Tim Eberhardt and Enrique Strelow for the data collection.

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Correspondence to Caspar Krampe .

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Krampe, C., Gier, N., Kenning, P. (2018). Beyond Traditional Neuroimaging: Can Mobile fNIRS Add to NeuroIS?. In: Davis, F., Riedl, R., vom Brocke, J., Léger, PM., Randolph, A. (eds) Information Systems and Neuroscience. Lecture Notes in Information Systems and Organisation, vol 25. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67431-5_17

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