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Seriously Relevant: Parody, Pastiche and Satire in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Novels

  • Gideon Haberkorn
Chapter
Part of the Critical Approaches to Children's Literature book series (CRACL)

Abstract

Gideon Haberkorn investigates ‘Parody, Pastiche and Satire in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Novels’. He argues that the development of the Discworld novels is marked by a movement away from straightforward pastiche towards parody and travesty. Over time, the emphasis has shifted from the source text to the new text, and pastiche has been replaced by increasingly sophisticated parody and satire, which Pratchett uses to create a fantasy world with a very real and relevant edge to it.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gideon Haberkorn
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ScholarWiesbadenGermany

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