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‘Not the Most Stable of Creatures’: Female Monstrosity and Gender Negotiations in the Character of Angua von Uberwald

  • Marion Rana
Chapter
Part of the Critical Approaches to Children's Literature book series (CRACL)

Abstract

In this chapter, Marion Rana exemplifies the ambiguity with which Pratchett tends to approach questions of social, racial and gender equality in the portrayal of werewolf and watchwoman Angua: the character of Angua both questions and perpetuates readings of female subjectivity, and this chapter looks at the ways in which Angua’s gender attributions (and transgressions) are linked to her werewolf nature and how that, in turn, can be read against the backdrop of a view of the female body as monstrous and grotesque.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marion Rana
    • 1
  1. 1.InterjuliLorchGermany

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