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History and Current State of Forensic Imaging

  • Hermann Vogel
Chapter

Abstract

When Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discovered X-rays on the 8th of November, 1895, not only Clinical Diagnostic Radiology but also Forensic Radiology came into being. Röntgen himself created the first radiographs, which showed the potential of the new rays concerning forensics. In 1896, Röntgen’s discovery induced fantasies—in 2016, some of these fantasies have materialised in forensics. Since 1896, X-rays have been utilised by forensic pathologists. As parts of new techniques and methods, X-rays help to answer old questions. In this chapter Milestones, Tools, and Techniques of post mortem and ante mortem forensic imaging are presented and discussed. The future will show whether and where Virtopsy shall be used in addition to forensic pathology—or instead of autopsy—and how far the applications of imaging methods without ionising radiation will increase the utilization and the diagnostic power in the clinical forensic medicine.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Legal MedicineUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany

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