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Case of a Girl with Cancer Seeking Fertility Counseling

  • Priscilla Rahmer
  • Catherine Benedict
  • Jonathan D. Fish

Abstract

An 18-year-old girl is diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma. The treatment of her cancer will include 8.4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide and 63 g/m2 of ifosfamide. She has questions about the impact the treatment may have on her future fertility and what options are available to preserve her fertility. Available fertility preservation techniques are discussed, including embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation, and ovarian tissue cryopreservation.

Keywords

Alkylators Cancer Chemotherapy Fertility preservation Oocyte cryopreservation Embryo cryopreservation 

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Suggested Educational Reading

  1. Fish JD. Fertility preservation for adolescent women with cancer. Adolesc Med State Art Rev. 2012;23:111–22, xi.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Priscilla Rahmer
    • 1
  • Catherine Benedict
    • 2
  • Jonathan D. Fish
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Stem Cell TransplantationSteven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New YorkNew Hyde ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineZucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/NorthwellHempsteadUSA
  3. 3.Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/NorthwellHempsteadUSA

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