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Towards Low-Cost P300-Based BCI Using Emotiv Epoc Headset

  • Xiangqian Liu
  • Fei Chao
  • Min Jiang
  • Changle Zhou
  • Weifeng Ren
  • Minghui ShiEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 650)

Abstract

P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been widely studied over two decades. However, there are several factors that hamper P300-based BCI to be used in daily life. EEG acquisition devices are often too much expensive for an average customer. Although the Emotiv Epoc headset is a kind of low-cost device for recording brain signals and has been adopted to develop some BCI systems, due to the limited number of electrodes, the Emotiv Epoc headset cannot cover the regions of scalp that are convenient for detecting P300, so the effectiveness of the Emotiv Epoc headset used in the P300-based BCI has been doubted by many researchers. This paper aims to examine the performance of Emotiv Epoc headset used in the P300-based BCI system. Six participants participated in the experiment and two paradigms were compared. The results demonstrated that P300 could be effectively detected from the brain signals recorded by the Emotiv Epoc headset, showing the promising future to develop low-cost P300-based BCI systems.

Keywords

Brain computer interface Emotiv Epoc headset P300 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The project was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province of China (Nos. 2017J01128 and 2017J01129) and by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61673322 and 61673328).

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangqian Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fei Chao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Min Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Changle Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weifeng Ren
    • 1
    • 2
  • Minghui Shi
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Cognitive Science, School of Information Science and EngineeringXiamen UniversityXiamenChina
  2. 2.Fujian Key Laboratory of Brain-inspired Computing Technique and ApplicationsXiamen UniversityXiamenChina

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