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From Sickness Absenteeism to Presenteeism

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The Positive Side of Occupational Health Psychology

Abstract

Throughout the past decades, sickness absenteeism has received increased attention in Norway. An important motive for this has been that sickness absenteeism is relatively easily converted into costs. The term presenteeism has been the subject of growing interest in the field and is largely related to sickness absenteeism. This chapter concerns presenteeism and what this term contributes to the debate about sickness absenteeism.

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Correspondence to Per Øystein Saksvik .

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Saksvik, P.Ø., Grødal, K., Karanika-Murray, M. (2017). From Sickness Absenteeism to Presenteeism. In: Christensen, M., Saksvik, P., Karanika-Murray, M. (eds) The Positive Side of Occupational Health Psychology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-66781-2_11

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