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The Three Pillars of Australian Army Psychology: To Serve with a Strong Foundation

  • Kylie A. TuppinEmail author
  • Laura SinclairEmail author
  • Nicole L. Sadler
Chapter

Abstract

The Australian Army Psychology Corps (AAPSYCH) is a uniformed psychology workforce that provides a highly valued variety of services across a range of areas in the Australian Defence Force. It uses the Three Pillars model to inform and guide its practices. These Pillars consist of Organizational Health and Effectiveness, Performance Enhancement, and Psychological Health and Readiness. Drawing from a number of different psychological specializations, these Pillars aim to support capability, operational effectiveness, and force preservation in the Australian Defence Force, and in turn are underpinned by enabling factors such as research and governance. This chapter describes the Three Pillars model in detail and demonstrates its wide applicability in the Australian Army, specifically on operations and within garrison. It also briefly outlines the history of AAPSYCH, and considers the anticipated future challenges and innovations occurring in the field of psychological support in the Australian Defence Force, and how this impacts the Three Pillars model.

Keywords

Military psychology Australian Army Psychology Corps Clinical psychology Organizational psychology Mental health Operational psychology Human factors Performance enhancement Three pillars model Psychological health and organizational readiness 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Career ManagementAustralian ArmyCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Mental Health, Psychology and Rehabilitation BranchJoint Health CommandCanberraAustralia

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