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The Practice Turn in Learning Theory and Science Education

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Constructivist Education in an Age of Accountability

Abstract

Recent developments in learning theory, referred to as the “practice turn” have suggested incorporation of disciplinary practices into classroom instruction. Instead of relying on a set of disembodied laboratory procedures and teacher-centered didactic instruction, advocates of this pedagogy propose that teachers and students create a new activity system that supports an epistemic culture for authentic scientific inquiry. It introduces students to the creative aspects of scientific practices through engagement in activities that involve representing, explaining, persuading, testing models, and making sense of scientific inquiry. Research in learning theory, science studies, and science education that has been used to articulate the practice turn in science education is reviewed and critiqued in this chapter.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    A more extensive discussion of the historical roots and current applications of the participation metaphor can be found in Ford and Forman (2006).

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Forman, E.A. (2018). The Practice Turn in Learning Theory and Science Education. In: Kritt, D. (eds) Constructivist Education in an Age of Accountability . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-66050-9_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-66050-9_5

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  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

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